Salsa Cycles La Raza Frames

DESCRIPTION

If Sal Paradise were alive today, we think he'd choose a La Razaâ„¢ for his adventures on the road. Its classic geometry has been proven to work well for virtually all types of riding. With a sloping top tube and a downsized seat tube (5cm less than traditional), the La Razaâ„¢ provides a better fit for some of those "non-average" bodies, while offering superior torsional rigidity and vertical compliance.

Sizes: 45cm, 48cm, 51cm, 54cm & 57cm.

USER REVIEWS

Showing 1-7 of 7  
[Oct 19, 2021]
Moonbeamix


OVERALL
RATING
5
Strength:

Firm, excellent handling,great endurance bike👍👍

Weakness:

Nil,nothing negative issues

Purchased:
New  
[Apr 28, 2008]
John Pierce
Recreational Rider

OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
5
Strength:

Ride quality.
Price (year-end closeout)

Weakness:

Bottle cage bosses are mounted low on the frame. Takes a bit of a reach to grab the bottle.

Bought this to replace my cracked Bianchi Talladega following an accident. Slightly larger frame (54cm vs. 53cm) and higher end steel (True Temper OX Platinum vs. Reynolds 631). I'm amazed at how much more comfortable the Salsa is to ride. I'm not a large rider (140 lbs) and find the frame adequately stiff and very smooth on long rides.

Similar Products Used:

Bianchi Talladega

[Sep 27, 2007]
Jukka
Recreational Rider

OVERALL
RATING
4
VALUE
RATING
4
Strength:

Good road manners, eyelets for mudguards, moderate weight for a steel frame, nice colour.

Weakness:

: Could really do with a bit more clearance for the mudguards, now it is too tight for 25 mm tires, even with 23 mm tires anything larger than a grain of sand tends to stick between the tire and the mudguard. Especially annoying on wet surfaces. Colour is nice, but does chip easily.

Bought the frame and the parts to go for building up the thing myself as a randonneur / recreational road bike. Turned out a fine road bike for fast (for me, that is) training rides and longer, more relaxed rides. Equipped with a rear rack it handles commuting equally well as long as the road suits the tires. At first I was not sure if the handling will do in long rides, felt pretty snappy at first, but during PBP qualifications got no problem from that department and it did not fail me at PBP, either. It can be ridden just fine with hands off, but it still feels lively enough for sporty riding.

Similar Products Used:

Olmo Sportsman 1997

[May 29, 2007]
Jim Morehouse
Road Racer

OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
5
Strength:

Everything about it. It's well designed, well built, looks great, rides even better.

Weakness:

They are no longer made. Some other company bought out Salsa, and I understand they're made in Taiwan now.

This is a hand made Salsa from 1998. One of the first, if not the first, sloping top tubes. A mix of Columbus and Reynolds 853, this frame out rides even the Colnago I had that was made by Ernesto himself. A wonderful, smooth, responsive bike. Unbelievably smooth welds.

Similar Products Used:

Masi, Colnaga, Le Jeune, Rickert, Schwinn Paramount, Trek, Motobecane, Mondia, Peugeot, Gitane, etc., etc.

[Jun 17, 2006]
masshoff
Recreational Rider

OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
4
Strength:

feel. price. uniqueness.

Weakness:

none really. maybe a slight weight disadvantage compared to CF rigs. but i'm not racing - and i'd rather be comfortable than a few seconds faster

I have only ridden this frame for less than a month - but have put about 500 miles on it. Coming from an aluminum Trek - and being oh so skeptical about any difference in feel - I must admit - it is far more comfortable to ride. The Trek was near abusive on my local roads - while the La Raza really just floats over the terrain. For me - a skeptic - steel is in fact real. I think the bike looks great too. I opted for the Vino Rojo color (interesting mix of italian and spanish, no?). it has a nice vintage-y kind of look to it - with the non-fat tubing and cream graphics on the red metalic paint. Welds are....well they aren't the prettiest thing i've seen. Not offensive - but a little "thick" looking (I remember the butterfly welds from my 80's era Mongoose BMX frame and hold those as the gold standard - I've not seen anything of that quality, tho). But the value as compared to other steel road frames was quite good. Weight seems to be comparable to my aluminum Trek, Carbon fork helps i guess

Similar Products Used:

Trek XO-1.

[Jan 31, 2006]
Anonymous
Recreational Rider

OVERALL
RATING
4
VALUE
RATING
4
Strength:

Solid traditional road frame is everything you need with no stupid marketing gimmicks or fancy paint jobs (because nice paint really means it's a good bike).

Weakness:

Paint chips when you smack the frame against other metal things. :-P

Built this frame up in 2003 and just want to say that I love it. This is a well built, no-frills, basic steel frame that gets the job done. Think of it as a Surly Pacer but a little more money and a heck of a lot lighter. It was a great ride for getting all over town in college and will be taking me on a double-century in the summer of 2006. Build it up right and you can make yourself a sub-20lb road bike. Pick one up on eBay if you can; the resale value sucks on less-recognized brands like this, and you'll probably get a screaming deal. You won't be sorry.

Similar Products Used:

Crap-ass department store mountain bikes.

[Mar 04, 2001]
Anonymous
Recreational Rider

OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
5
Strength:

Smooth riding steel, incredible confidence in cornering. Quality of workmanship-this is a real Petaluma made Salsa from the Ross Shafer era. To duplicate this now buy Soulcraft, a couple of the former Salsa guys building killer quality frames.

Weakness:

No obvious weaknesses, a nice riding bike. A personal thing is that mine feels just a tad small for me but I got an unbelievably good deal-one of those that comes along about once every 10 years. A former employee of the shop moved out of the area and needed cash-the bike was about my size so I was in the right place at the right time. I think the bike was less than a year old-there was a scratch on the left crank but other than that it could have been off the showroom floor. The shop owner told me the original retail value was in the $3,000 range. Salsa frames and forks alone sold for about $1,100 in '98-'99.

I don't want to come down on the people at Quality Bicycle Products that now own Salsa but I have been told by a few bike industry people that the new frames are not what they used to be. If you can find a real Petaluma made Salsa you won't go wrong. My bike has a sloping top tube which freaked out roadies several years ago when looking at the Salsa but apparently Ross Shafer was ahead of his time as witnessed by all the slopers in the Euro peloton these days. Mine is the equivalent of a 59 cm-weighs 19 lbs.,11 oz. Pretty darn light for a steel bike although it does have all the tricked out parts. As I mentioned earlier check out Soulcraft-liquid looking tig welds!

Similar Products Used:

All kinds of steel road bikes. It is real after all.

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