Bianchi Volpe Road Bike

DESCRIPTION

Frame Material: Reynolds 520
Frame Angles: Unspecified
Sizes: 44cm, 49cm, 52cm, 55cm, 58cm, 61cm
Colors: Blue
Fork: Bianchi
Rear Shock: Not applicable
Brake Levers: Shimano Tiagra STI Dual Control
Handlebar: Bianchi aluminum
Stem: Bianchi aluminum
Headset: 1" VP Threadless
Front Der: Shimano Tiagra Triple, clamp-on/28.6mm
Crankset: TruVativ Elita, 30/42/52 teeth
Rear Der: Shimano Deore
Pedals: WTB MP350
Tires: 700 x 32c WTB All Terrainasaurus

USER REVIEWS

Showing 1-10 of 11  
[Jun 29, 2021]
rubydeol69


OVERALL
RATING
5
Strength:

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Weakness:

I would like to thank you for the efforts you have made

Price Paid:
10000
Purchased:
New  
Model Year:
2021
[Jun 27, 2021]
SRFAudio


OVERALL
RATING
5
Strength:

I've been riding a 2013 Volpe as a daily commuter for 8 years. I've easily put over 2000 miles on it, and it's just rock solid comfortable. I ride with front and rear racks, and a faithful brooks saddle. I don't even have to think about the bike because it just rides so naturally. The only problem I ever had was a frame/brake wobble when braking while going downhill, and that was fixed with a simple spacer. I'm writing this review years after I purchased the bike, just to give a perspective on how reliable it's been. My enthusiasm hasn't waned with time. It's a brilliantly designed bike.

Weakness:

I replaced the stock tires and saddle almost immediately, but I consider those to be preferential elements anyway. They're ride-able for recreational usage, but you've most likely already got your saddle and tire of choice picked out.

Price Paid:
1300
Purchased:
New  
Model Year:
2013
[Aug 23, 2012]
scorchedearth

OVERALL
RATING
4
VALUE
RATING
5
Strength:

Versatile, comfortable, fast, good components, and a wonderful ride.

Weakness:

Brakes aren't great but they can be adjusted.

I've put over 1000km on this bike since May and have loved every minute. This bike has become my go to ride fcr road rides and commuting. It being my first ever bike with drop bars has resulted in me needing to get accustomed to a different position but it now feels second nature. I can even keep up with my carbon framed, Dura Ace equipped roadie buddies on the Vixen without any problems. Initially when riding, I discovered the brake chatter issue on some steep hills but playing with the brake pads a little has resolved that minor issue. The highest speed I've reached so far has been over 60km/h. Atg that speed, the bike was stable and I didn't experience any wobbling or unexpected behaviour. This is an excellent machine for your money.

I'd buy another one.

[Dec 31, 2009]
G Shumway
Triathlete

OVERALL
RATING
2
VALUE
RATING
3
Strength:

I was not very happy with this bike, and Bianchi was very slow in getting me a new frame.

Weakness:

Frame strength: broke after 3500 miles
Chattering fork
Poor braking
Slow response from Bianchi

I broke the chainstay on the drive side without having an accident-it just broke. The short and upright geometry challenged balance slightly. The front fork chattered when braking, and no mechanic figured out a solution.

Similar Products Used:

Surly Long Haul Trucker

[Oct 20, 2009]
loggerhead
Recreational Rider

OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
5
Strength:

Smooth ride on all roads, low vibe

Weakness:

needed to change seat all else was skookum!

Great bike for rough road surfaces. The bike worked well on steepest roads. It worked great as a touring bike with 30 lbs and a 190 lb rider I love this bike

[Mar 26, 2008]
Anonymous
Commuter

OVERALL
RATING
4
VALUE
RATING
5
Strength:

Inexpensive
Bomb-proof frame
Durable, reliable components
Comfortable ride
Easily accommodates necessary commuting crap like fenders, lights, racks, etc.
Looks cool

Weakness:

Somewhat heavy
Not a high performance ride
Braking (not awful, but not great either)

I’ve ridden my Volpe just over 3,000 miles in the past year and a half. Most of those miles were on my commute to and from work. In the past couple months I’ve also done quite a few 20 – 50 mile training rides on it as I’m getting in shape for a double century this summer.

The Volpe is outstanding as an inexpensive daily commuter. It has a comfortable somewhat upright geometry that you can ride all day. The steel frame is not the stiffest or lightest thing out there, but it rides smooth and handles all the potholes and rough pavement my commute throws at it. I’ve had to replace brake pads, tires, cassette and the chain, but I consider that all to be standard maintenance for the number of miles it’s seen, especially since I ride in the rain a lot (Did I mention I live in Seattle?). Shifting has always been accurate and smooth, and the brakes do a decent job of stopping me on steep Seattle hills in the rain. One complaint about braking… I’m not sure if this is the fault of the brakes, the forks, geometry or what, but if I’m braking hard with my hands up on the hoods, the front brake can start vibrating or chattering pretty badly. It gets a little scary in traffic on steep hills.

Bianchi made some compromises on components to keep the cost down, but it seems like they made the compromises in the right places, especially if what you want is low-maintenance, reliable transportation. The frame is built to easily handle just about any fenders, tires and racks you want to throw at it. In the wintertime I run big 32C tires for better traction in the rain, and there’s still plenty of clearance with fenders. I’m sure you could use bigger tires if you wanted to.

The Volpe has been comfortable on my recent training rides, but it definitely doesn’t climb or accelerate like any of the more race-oriented road bikes I’ve been on. I’ll probably buy a new “go-fast” bike one of these days for recreational riding, but I’ll keep commuting on the Volpe.

One more thing about the Volpe… I personally love the “gang green” paint job with red lettering that gives it that urban counter-culture bike messenger vibe. Yeah, I know it’s really just another mass-produced bike, but looks too cool. Others will probably disagree, but I think they totally ruined the looks with the new 2008 paint colors and decals.

Similar Products Used:

None

[Mar 09, 2008]
Marcos_E
Commuter

OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
5
Strength:

+ Great ride quality
+ I like the leopard print saddle back
+ Comfortable riding position
+ The top tube is a bit oblong, making the bike easy to put on your shoulder

Weakness:

- The stock tires seem to be a bit more delicate than they let on.

Initially as I opened this bike from its package, two things stood out:

1. The leopard print on the saddle

2. How HUGE the STI shifters are (I'm a Campy brat)

All jokes aside, I was very pleased with this bicycle after putting it together. After having used it for roughly a month for general commuting I can safely say it is the perfect commuter, but I am not entirely convinced that it would make a good CX bike.

The reason I say this is because the riding position is quite a bit upright and the BB clearance doesn't seem as high as it could be. Maybe it'd work in a dry CX race, but if there's gonna be mud, I recommend against it.

As far as commuting though, this thing is an absolute dream. The steel really eats up the road vibrations and the saddle is very comfortable, if not a bit showy.

I give it flying recommendations to anyone wanting a great commuter or light touring bike, but for a crazy Sunday of CX, look elsewhere.

Similar Products Used:

None.

[Aug 14, 2007]
Thomas
Recreational Rider

OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
5
Strength:

Easy to shift, rack and fender ready, works well for commutting and touring.
Original Seat is great, have tried others but have gone back to original, seams to fit me best.

Weakness:

Chirps when shifting, have had tune ups and still chirps, does not seem to affect shifting.

I use this bike for commuting and touring. Added full fenders and racks plus uro bar with GPS bracket. Run Continental Contact tires. If you want to get into touring and also have a solid commuter bike without breaking the bank this is one way to do it. Very well made, smooth shifting bike. I live in the Washington State and ride spring, summer and fall (winter if not below freezing) rain or shine and once or twice in a snow storm. I have taken this bike on some overnight trips fully loaded, about 50 pounds and myself 180 lbs, with no problems. Has all the attachment points for racks and fenders, front and back. Plan to ride from Seattle to San Francisco on the coast hwy next year with my Volpe.

[Jan 16, 2007]
John
Commuter

OVERALL
RATING
4
VALUE
RATING
4
Strength:

Comfort, shock absorption, versatility and great bang for the buck.

Weakness:

Wheelset (rear came new with a hop and was toast by 1300 miles, needing rebuilt); Tiagra shifting is crisp at first but then develops its midrange idiosyncracies after a thousand miles or so; not a great touring bike (unless all you pack is a rain jacket and a credit card); tighter geometry causes toe overlap with fenders; another set of rear eyelets would be nice for mounting both a rack and fenders.

The Volpe is one great bike. I bought it when my race bike went out of service for a while so I wouldn't miss any riding. I used it for long commutes to work (60 miles one way) and gradually set it up for day touring and weekend trips. I love the feel of the bike. It is comfortable for hours on end and absorbs road shock really well. It is, however, a totally different machine when loaded with a few days' worth of gear. I balanced a 3 day load between front and rear Jandd racks and was amazed to feel as if I was riding a different bike. The frame flexes a lot laterally and the front fork chatter (which was an occasional problem when unloaded) became a scary issue at speed with 30 or so pounds of gear. To be fair, I've adjusted the brakes and eliminated most of that, but am also considering a better headset ... if I don't buy an outright touring bike to replace the Volpe for tripping. Even if I did that I don't think I'd part with this bike. It is truly a pleasure to ride and is extremely versatile. Without the touring rig I'd even ride it on trails. If, heaven forbid, I had to own but one bike (and had to pick a stock bike off a shelf), the Volpe would most likely be that one.

Similar Products Used:

Surly Cross Check, Surly Pacer, Trek XO-1

[Nov 24, 2006]
Anonymous
Commuter

OVERALL
RATING
4
VALUE
RATING
4
Strength:

Good ride on steel frame, handles descents and curves well under load. Great rims with lots of spokes stay true on bad roads under load. Gearing is excellent.

Weakness:

Brakes are so so. Tiagara shifting so so at best. Wellgo pedals work well but are cheap, may not last long.

Very nice bike. Steel frame gives great ride on Pennsylvania back roads, which are rough. Bike handles well in all commuting conditions, including some through construction zone mud. Gearing is great for me, I carry about 20 lb. extra with my rack, light, panniers, battery, computer, fenders, clothing, lunch, and extra gear. I ride in fairly steep hill country, so 11-32 with the 28-38-48 covers all needs. Tiagara shifting is okay at best, requires much more finesse than the Campy Veloce on my road bike. Tiagara can't seem to get all shifts from high to low no matter how I adjust it. Somewhere it will give a ghost shift or a hesitation. Might change out to higher level Shimano, or if I'm feeling like spending $, all the way to all Campy. I changed out the semi knobby tires for a good set of Schwalbes for the road. Will save the All terrainasauras for the trail, if I ever do that.

Similar Products Used:

Olmo road bike with Campy Veloce

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